NY Times: What Happened at the Bronx Fire

At least 12 people were killed when a fire rushed through a five-story apartment building in the Bronx on Thursday night, New York City officials said. Four of the dead were children.

The fire was caused by a 3-year-old boy playing with the knobs on a stove, city officials said. His mother ran out of the first-floor apartment with her two children, leaving the door open. The fire shot out of the kitchen and up the stairs, killing people on multiple floors.

The building had six open violations, including one for a broken smoke detector in a first-floor apartment, according to city records. But officials said those issues did not seem to be related to the fire. It was the deadliest fire in the city since an inferno at the Happy Land social club — less than a mile from Thursday’s blaze — killed 87 people in 1990.

Additional imagery for viewing:

Source: Google Imagery & New York Times, “What Happened at the Bronx Fire” By Sarah Almukhtar, Kenan Davis, andDec. 29, 2017

Death of woman found on Saskatoon fire escape not believed to be suspicious: police

Saskatoon police and MD Ambulance responded to the scene GREG PENDER / SASKATOON STAR PHOENIX

The death of a 55-year-old woman whose body was found on the fire escape of a downtown Saskatoon building does not appear to be suspicious, according to police.

A passerby on Thursday around 6:15 a.m. noticed the woman’s body on a fire escape in the 200 block of Third Avenue South, according to Saskatoon police in a news release. The early investigation and autopsy “has shown nothing suspicious about the woman’s death,” police said.

The Saskatoon police major crimes unit is assisting the provincial coroner in the investigation. Police are attempting to collect surveillance video taken in the area to assist in the investigation.

According to Saskatoon police spokeswoman Alyson Edwards, it is not a criminal investigation. Major crimes is assisting with the case because of the wide-ranging skills of the unit’s investigators, she said.

According to a provincial justice spokeswoman, the provincial coroner “is unable to provide any further details until the investigation is completed.” The spokeswoman said it generally takes about six months for a coroner to obtain all medical reports and finish an investigation.

Source: Saskatoon Star Phoenix “Death of woman found on Saskatoon fire escape not believed to be suspicious: police”, by Greg Pender Published on: February 2, 2018 | Last Updated: February 2, 2018 4:52 PM CST

Chinatown Tenants Forced Into Shelter Fear Landlord Won’t Let Them Return

Residents of 85 Bowery worry a broken staircase could be used as a pretext to evict them

85 Bowery
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY THE VILLAGE VOICE

More than 85 people were forced out of their embattled Chinatown building last Thursday when the city declared the building unsafe — and they fear the landlord, who has been trying to evict them for years, will now refuse to do the repairs and use it as a pretext to kick tenants out.

The New York City Department of Buildings issued a full vacate order at 85 Bowery on January 18 after an inspector ruled that the building’s main staircase was structurally unstable and therefore a “significant life-safety hazard.” The city gave the landlord, Joseph Betesh, two weeks to replace the stairway.

The Red Cross says it registered 29 households, including 71 adults and 15 children, after the eviction, and reports that as of yesterday it is providing emergency shelter for 27 of those families. The displaced families, including newborns and people up to 90 years old, were sent to a hotel in Brownsville that the city uses to house homeless people. Tenant association representative Jinming Cao says they were initially sleeping in one large room on mattresses with no blankets. Blankets were provided after a TV news crew showed up Sunday night, says Sarah Ahn of the Chinese Staff and Workers’ Association, a neighborhood activist organization working with the tenants. The displaced families were moved into separate rooms as of yesterday, Cao tells the Voice.

While the Red Cross normally only provides emergency shelter for 24 to 48 hours, a spokesperson for the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development says it “will continue to extend their stay at their current hotel until space becomes available at one of our family centers.”

Betesh has been trying to evict all the tenants of 85 Bowery and the building next door, 83 Bowery, for more than two years, claiming in court that the buildings were not rent-stabilized and that necessary repairs can’t be done while people are still living there. Last month, the Division of Housing and Community Renewal recommended that the State Supreme Court judge handling the case declare that the buildings are rent-stabilized.

“The main thing is the landlord wants all the tenants out,” says Cao, whose cousin lives in one of the buildings and who has become a spokesperson for the tenant association because, unlike the Chinese-immigrant tenants, he speaks English. City emergency workers, he says, told the evicted tenants that if the landlord doesn’t cooperate, it would be a long time before they could come back.

“We’re determined to make the owner fix these stairs quickly, get residents back in their homes, and meet his legal and moral responsibility to have a safe building for residents,” the Department of Buildings said in a statement.

Tenants have been demanding repairs for more than two years. In February 2016, a Housing Court judge ordered Betesh to fix the staircase at 85 Bowery by the end of that April, in response to “HP actions,” lawsuits demanding repairs filed by both the tenants and HPD. Betesh never made the repairs. The engineer the building owners hired argued that the staircase could not be replaced while the tenants were there because of “badly cracked joists.” An engineer the tenants hired responded that the tenants could stay while the joists were being replaced if protective barriers were installed in the hallways.

In September 2016, Betesh agreed to hold off temporarily on his eviction attempts in exchange for tenants agreeing to stay the HP action and extend the deadline for repairs. Later that month, however, he filed another motion demanding their immediate eviction.

In a statement given to NY1 after it broadcast a story on Thursday’s eviction, a spokesperson for Betesh’s Bowery 8385 LLC said the owners were “taking immediate steps to repair building infrastructure and make the property safe for habitation.” The woman who answered the phone at Betesh’s Milestone Equities Monday told the Voice that “no one is in the office. Everyone is on vacation.”*

***

While tenants have a guaranteed right to return to apartments after they’ve been repaired, says Adam Meyers, a staff attorney at Brooklyn Legal Services Corporation A, “this right is somewhat empty when it can take years for the landlord to restore a building to habitable condition.”

Meyers represents tenants at 94 Franklin Avenue, a seven-apartment rent-stabilized building in Bedford-Stuyvesant that the Department of Buildings ordered vacated in July 2015, he says, after its Hasidic landlords built a synagogue in the backyard without a permit, blocking the fire escape. Two and a half years later, some of the tenants are renting apartments for “significantly more” than they had been paying, according to Meyers, while others are still in a city shelter in East New York.

The Department of Buildings and HPD “have done little to address the issue,” Meyers says. The buildings department “has not required the landlords to remove the illegal structure from the backyard,” he says, while HPD has refused to back tenant demands that the building be turned over to a court-appointed 7A administrator who could get repairs done more quickly.

85 Bowery tenants at their temporary shelter in Brownsville
COURTESY OF 83-85 BOWERY TENANTS ASSOCIATION

The city itself used unsafe building conditions as a pretext for a mass eviction in 1995, when the Giuliani administration ousted squatters from three abandoned buildings on East 13th Street on the Lower East Side that the city had seized from tax-delinquent landlords in the 1970s. The squatters had won a temporary restraining order in the fall of 1994 protecting them from eviction until a court ruled on their claim that they were entitled to keep the buildings under an obscure legal principle called “adverse possession” — that because they’d lived there for ten years and the city hadn’t previously tried to kick them out, the property was legally abandoned.

The three buildings passed a safety inspection, but after heavy rains in April 1995, the Giuliani administration declared them “in imminent danger of collapse.” After a bit of litigation, it sent in a massive paramilitary force to kick the squatters out.

***

In his statement to NY1, Betesh blamed the tenants for the delay. “Over the past two years, we repeatedly told city officials that it was necessary to vacate this property in order to safely perform much-needed repairs and ensure structural stability,” the statement said. “We repeatedly communicated all of this information to the building’s occupants and have spent the past two years working to find a positive resolution, but our proposals were rejected at every turn by their lawyers and other representatives.”

The statement also accused the tenants of doing “illegal renovation work that further contributed to the building’s structural instability,” saying it had discovered that “11 of the building’s 16 apartments were illegally converted into nearly 40 single-room-occupancy (SRO) units,” and that those rooms were a fire hazard.

“That’s a lie,” says Cao. “Those rooms have already been like that for 20 to 30 years.” He says tenants told him those rooms were constructed by the building’s previous landlord, who also installed fire-safety equipment.

A buildings department spokesperson tells the Voice that if the landlord doesn’t get the repairs done on time, it could issue a violation, the State Supreme Court judge could step in, or HPD’s Emergency Repair Program could do the work. “We don’t see any indication as of now that any of that will be necessary,” the spokesperson says.

HPD referred questions about what happens if the owner doesn’t comply to the buildings department.

“The tenants have no trust in the landlord that he will adhere to the court’s timeline of two weeks, nor that he will not purposely do a shoddy job,” Sarah Ahn tells the Voice. She said the group would “continue to fight for a guarantee” that the tenants would get back to their homes.

“I don’t know what is in the landlord’s head,” says Seth Miller, the lawyer representing the tenants. “We are afraid it will be used as a pretext” for permanent evictions.

As of Monday, says Cao, 85 Bowery’s tenants were being allowed to return to their apartments for 15 minutes at a time, to retrieve medications and anything else they urgently needed. The Betesh statement said the owner is “already taking steps to clear out debris.”

On Monday night, two dumpsters in front of the building were filled with garbage bags and thin sheets of wood with nails sticking out of their edges. The building’s first-floor commercial space had been stripped down to timbers. The staircase was still there, listing to the right.

The 83-85 Bowery Tenants Association and the Coalition to Protect Chinatown and the Lower East Side are planning a protest outside HPD’s Gold Street offices at 3:30 p.m. today, to demand that the agency do the repairs itself, before the two-week deadline.

“If the city can force tenants out, why can’t it force landlords to make repairs?” Cao asks. “If he doesn’t repair, why not put him in jail?”

*UPDATE: After publication of this piece, a spokesperson for Bowery 8385 LLC emailed the Voice to say that the landlord is working with the Department of Buildings and the Mayor’s Office on repairs. “Any reports claiming that we seek to demolish 83-85 Bowery or replace it with a hotel or condominiums are false,” said the spokesperson. “We all share the same goal — moving families back into their homes as quickly as possible. As we have been saying for years, and as we believe all parties would agree, those homes must be safe.”

Source: Village Voice: “Chinatown Tenants Forced Into Shelter Fear Landlord Won’t Let Them Return” by STEVEN WISHNIA JANUARY 24, 2018

RED CROSS PROVIDES FIRE SAFETY TIPS AFTER DEADLY LOVEJOY BLAZE

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Anthony Conti, 7, died after a fire engulfed his Lovejoy home Monday.

His death is raising awareness about emergency preparedness, fire safety and programs in the area.

“We will come into your home if you need them. We will check any smoke alarms that you have, replace batteries, install up to three free smoke alarms,” said Jay Bonafede, American Red Cross of WNY.

Smoke alarms should be at least on every floor of the home, if not in every room.

“Having working smoke alarms in a home does cut the risk of dying in a house fire in half, so they’re a really important and really simple thing you can do,” said Bonafede.

The Red Cross not only does free installations, but they will help families develop an emergency action plan.

“We give them a little white board that actually has their home on it, so they can put it on their fridge, so that the kids know that the important thing is to escape,” said Alexis Willard, Red Cross disaster program specialist.

Every room should have two escape routes. Fire escape ladders can help with windows on higher floors.

“You want them for every window that you don’t really have an access to get out safely so you’re not breaking your legs,” said Willard.

And developing the plan is just the first step. Experts say it is equally important to practice that plan, so you know how to put it into action.

“And then you can actually practice this by actually going out of your fire escape ladder and seeing how long it actually takes you to get out of the building,” said Willard.

Some general fire safety tips include keeping space heaters and candles three feet away from anything flammable, plug small appliances directly into the wall without using extension cords, and never smoke in bed.

Source: Buffalo, NY Spectrum News: “Red Cross provides fire safety tips after deadly Lovejoy blaze” by Katie Gibas | January 31, 2018 @9:01 PM

Man critically injured, baby resuscitated after being pulled from fire

Gallery: Fire on Grant Avenue in Jersey City

JERSEY CITY – Firefighters are battling a devastating blaze on Grant Avenue tonight.

The four-alarm fire at 21 Grant Ave. critically injured one man and an infant needed to be resuscitated by first responders, Fire Chief Steven McGill said at the scene.

Firefighters arrived at the blaze at about 7 p.m. and more than an hour later the blaze was still not under control. The entire block was covered in smoke, making it difficult to breathe.

McGill said the male victim — whose injuries are considered life-threatening — was pulled from the basement of the three-story building, where the fire is believed to have started.

An infant was not breathing when first responders arrived at the scene. The baby was brought inside a nearby home and was resuscitated. The infant is expected to survive, McGill said.

A third victim was taken to the hospital after he suffered a cut on his hand trying to escape the blaze from the building’s fire escape.

Additional information was not immediately available.

Source: The Jersey Journal, “Man critically injured, baby resuscitated after being pulled from fire” by Caitlin Mota

Caitlin Mota may be reached at cmota@jjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @caitlin_mota. Find The Jersey Journal on Facebook.

KCK firefighters lucky to escape with only minor injuries when upper floor collapses

KANSAS CITY, KAN. — Three firefighters were injured when a floor collapsed while they were putting out a house fire in Kansas City, Kansas. The fire happened just before 3 a.m. Sunday morning in a vacant home located in the 1600 block of North 7th Street.

Thankfully all three first responders are alive and out of the hospital at this time. Those who saw this early morning fire say it lit up the whole block.

“I was just looking out my window in an instant and I just heard the ambulance come and the firefighters and then I looked out again and it was on fire out of nowhere,” said Latrice Paul who witnessed the fire.

Charles Banks lives near the home that caught fire and says his wife called 911 when they first noticed flames.

“My wife thought it was raining or something, a crackling sound and when she looked out the window it wasn’t raining it was fire and she just said call 9-1-1 the house is on fire next door,” he explained.

Banks says the home next to his has been vacant for at least a decade. The fire made him a little nervous because there’s only about seven feet of space between the two homes.

Firefighters arrived within minutes and were able to get the blaze under control pretty quickly, but when they were putting out hot spots on an upper floor when it gave way. Four firefighters fell to the first floor.

Two were taken to the hospital immediately from the fire scene, while a third was taken to the hospital some time later.

“We had an incident where part of the second floor collapsed and a couple firefighters had to go to the hospital with minor injuries,” said Chief Morris Letcher, Battalion Chief with the Kansas City, Kansas Fire Department.

Fire officials say they train for structure collapses, but work hard to avoid them.

“It’s scary, as an incident commander you just have to try to prepare and try to be mindful of things that can happen when you’re at a fire. Due to our training, we look for signs to give us a heads up as far as if that might be possible,” said Letcher.

But given the condition of the home, that was difficult.

“Vacant buildings always present challenges in a sense, you never know who’s been in there, what type of condition the floor is in, the roof and the structure, how long it’s been vacant and things like that,” Letcher explained.

All three firefighters involved in the collapse are now home from the hospital.

“That was a good thing because that was my main concern, I was asking the guy, ‘is everybody okay?’ and he said, ‘yeah’ so that was good,” said Banks.

Fire officials estimate there’s about $35,000 worth of damage at the home. They’re working to determine an official cause.

SOURCE: KCK firefighters lucky to escape with only minor injuries when upper floor collapses by Shayla Patrick Fox 4 Kansas City Posted 6:58PM, January 28, 2018.

AT LEAST 22 CIVILIANS, FIREFIGHER HURT IN LARGE SCALE FIRE

WTVA, NY: A fire that ripped through a four-story mix-use building in the Bronx Tuesday morning has injured at least 22 people …

A fire that ripped through a four-story mix-use building in the Bronx Tuesday morning has injured at least 22 people and a firefighter, as crews battled freezing temperatures in their fight against the flames, according to the FDNY.

About 200 firefighters responded to the fire, which began about 5:30 a.m. on the first floor of 1547 Commonwealth Ave., near East Tremont Avenue, officials said. As of 11:30 a.m., firefighters continued to battle the blaze.

The fire is believed to have started on the building’s first floor, which houses a furniture store. There are apartments located on the floors above.

Google Maps Imagery

At least 22 civilians and a firefighter were hurt. All of their injuries are non-life threatening, FDNY said.

Fire officials advised residents near the fire to close their windows because of smoke and warned drivers to expect traffic delays in the area.

Firefighters have been pulled from the building and are fighting the blaze from outside, FDNY said. Large icicles could be seen forming on the building’s fire escapes, as water used by the firefighters began to freeze amid a snap of brutally cold temperatures.

A resident said she tried to flee via the fire escape, but a gate was blocking the window. Her son and daughter were able to get through, but it was not until firefighters broke the gate that she and her husband could escape.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

This blaze comes days another Bronx fire killed 12 people in the one of the deadliest fires in the city in more than a quarter century. The Dec. 28 fire was started by a small child playing with a stove on the first floor, according to Fire Commissioner Daniel Nigro.

The child’s mother heard him screaming and escaped the unit, but, according to Nigro, she left the apartment door open.

Source: ABC WTVA & FOX WLOV, New York.
Posted: Jan. 3, 2018 1:42 PM
Updated: Jan. 3, 2018 8:33 PM

Man fatally falls from fire escape after fight with girlfriend

A man who threatened his girlfriend with a knife early Sunday fell to his death after losing his footing on the fire escape as he tried to climb back into their Bronx apartment, police said.

Pedro Polanco, 27, and his 36-year-old girlfriend had friends at their flat on 182nd St. near Mapes Ave. in Belmont when they began fighting around 3:30 a.m. He repeatedly pushed her and flashed an intimidating blade, according to cops.

After she demanded he leave the fifth-floor apartment, where they live with their two young children, he climbed from the roof onto the fire escape — a familiar re-entry route he’d traveled before, according to officials.

But this time he lost his footing and accidentally fell, police said.

Medics discovered Polanco conscious and alert, but with severe trauma to his lower body, police said. They rushed him to St. Barnabas Hospital, where he died an hour later.

Polanco’s girlfriend was not seriously hurt. Cops continued to investigate the incident on Sunday, but said they do not suspect foul play.

Polanco’s mom, Francisca Garcia, said his girlfriend called her after an ambulance took him away.

“She said, ‘Please forgive me,’ ” Garcia said as she sobbed and dried her eyes with a wash cloth.

The dead man’s father, Pedro Polanco Jesus, said he’s still not sure if his son jumped or fell.

“We don’t know,” he said. “The police are still investigating.”

In addition to his kids in the Bronx, a boy, 4, and a girl, 2, Polanco has two children in his native Dominican Republic, neighbors said.

Polanco’s parents live in a basement apartment in the same building.

Neighbors described Polanco as quiet and friendly.

“I saw him yesterday around 4 or 5 o’clock. He was standing right here,” said neighbor Jose Fernandez, 57.

“He didn’t talk much, he was quiet. I said ‘What’s wrong with you, you don’t talk? Christmas is coming, you better be happy”.

Source: NY Daily News – Man fatally falls from fire escape after fight with girlfriend

Harvard Lampoon Building presented Historic Preservation Award

Secretary of the Commonwealth William Galvin, chairman of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, recently announced the selection of the Harvard Lampoon Building in Cambridge to receive a 2017 Massachusetts Historical Commission Historic Preservation Award.

“The Massachusetts Historical Commission is proud to recognize the extraordinary accomplishments of this year’s awardees,” Galvin said. “The projects the commission is recognizing this year are particularly diverse and represent the many creative ways that significant historic resources are being preserved across the Commonwealth. The restoration of the Harvard Lampoon Building demonstrates an exceptional attention to detail.”

Located just south of Harvard Square in Cambridge, the Harvard Lampoon occupies a building that was one of the last major works of Boston city architect, Edmund Wheelwright. Wheelwright, a Harvard alumnus and a founder of the Harvard Lampoon magazine, one of the nation’s first college humor magazines, wanted the building to embody the comical nature of the publication. Completed in 1909, the Harvard Lampoon Building exhibits a synthesis of the formal Gothic and early Renaissance styles, with Flemish architectural influences, and is marked by a tower at its main entrance.

A century after its completion, the Lampoon Building still retained much of its original character and motifs, but was in need of functional, structural and cosmetic work. The most significant challenge was the need for a secondary means of egress from the second floor to meet modern code requirements. The only feasible option was to add a new exterior door and fire escape on the Plympton Street façade, yet the prominence of this façade meant that any intervention needed to be thoroughly thought out and precisely executed in order to maintain the building’s integrity. To that end, the design for the secondary egress included a new door with a limestone surround and Tudor hood molding, which were carefully integrated into the existing stringcourse. The new fire escape is shrouded with a decorative wrought-iron railing that runs the full width of the Plympton Street façade. Designed after a careful study of early 20th century metalwork in Boston and Cambridge, the railing features metal newels that complement the historic motifs of the building, including “HL” monograms, grotesques with jester hats and three book-shaped cartouches that together spell out the Lampoon’s original motto, “Vanitas.”

Along with the insertion of the new means of egress, significant structural problems were addressed on the Plympton Street façade. A steel beam had rusted over the ground-floor entry and windows, resulting in severe cracking of the surrounding masonry. Once the beam was cleaned, reinforced and waterproofed, the damaged area of limestone was patched and replaced as needed. Restoration of the masonry and windows at the building’s east end was also undertaken. All exterior masonry was cleaned, and inappropriate replacement mortar from previous repairs was replaced with mortar matching the original in color and texture. Similarly, on the inside, the replacement black mortar was removed and, after cleaning off dirt and soot, it was possible to match the original mortar’s lighter color and texture. Leaded glass windows, whose deterioration had been accelerated due to their covering by unvented storm panels, were cleaned and repainted once those panels were removed.

This is the 39th year of MHC’s Preservation Awards program. Projects are considered annually for awards in the categories of Rehabilitation and Restoration, Adaptive Reuse, Education and Outreach, Archaeology, Stewardship and Landscape Preservation. Individuals are considered in the categories of Individual Lifetime Achievement and Local Preservationist. Galvin serves as the chair of the 17-member Massachusetts Historical Commission.

Source: Wicked Local – Cambridge

Bryan offering grant money for safety improvements to downtown buildings

BRYAN, Tex. (KBTX) The City of Bryan is taking a new approach to making downtown businesses and residences safer. They’re offering grant money to bring older buildings up to new fire code standards.

Some historic buildings in Downtown Bryan have been lost or damaged to fire in recent years. The Court’s Saddlery building was destroyed in January 2011. The Edge’s building, which is home to the Halo nightclub, was significantly damaged in 2015. Even a small fire at RX Pizza back in March had fire crews scrambling to make sure flames didn’t spread.

The city is trying to get the word out about a grant for downtown busineses on Main Street and Bryan Avenue to bring fire safety improvements.

“The Life Safety Grant is really there to help renovate some of the older buildings in Downtown Bryan. It’s very difficult to add a fire protection system or alarm system or exits or windows or doors to some of these old structures without some financial assistance,” said Marc McFeron, the Bryan Fire Marshal.

The Queen Theatre, currently under massive renovation, is the city’s latest grant recipient.
Some historic buildings in Downtown Bryan have been lost or damaged to fire in recent years. The Court’s Saddlery building was destroyed in January 2011. The Edge’s building, which is home to the Halo nightclub, was significantly damaged in 2015. Even a small fire at RX Pizza back in March had fire crews scrambling to make sure flames didn’t spread.

The city is trying to get the word out about a grant for downtown busineses on Main Street and Bryan Avenue to bring fire safety improvements.

“The Life Safety Grant is really there to help renovate some of the older buildings in Downtown Bryan. It’s very difficult to add a fire protection system or alarm system or exits or windows or doors to some of these old structures without some financial assistance,” said Marc McFeron, the Bryan Fire Marshal.

The Queen Theatre, currently under massive renovation, is the city’s latest grant recipient.

Some historic buildings in Downtown Bryan have been lost or damaged to fire in recent years. The Court’s Saddlery building was destroyed in January 2011. The Edge’s building, which is home to the Halo nightclub, was significantly damaged in 2015. Even a small fire at RX Pizza back in March had fire crews scrambling to make sure flames didn’t spread.

The city is trying to get the word out about a grant for downtown busineses on Main Street and Bryan Avenue to bring fire safety improvements.

“The Life Safety Grant is really there to help renovate some of the older buildings in Downtown Bryan. It’s very difficult to add a fire protection system or alarm system or exits or windows or doors to some of these old structures without some financial assistance,” said Marc McFeron, the Bryan Fire Marshal.

The Queen Theatre, currently under massive renovation, is the city’s latest grant recipient.

Other locations that have received grant assistance include office and loft space at 212 North Bryan Avenue, and The Halo Nightclub in the Edges Building. The Fire Marshal tells us RX Pizza was also given assistance on fire suppression for their ventilation hoods.

Businesses or property owners interested in the grant can call Stephanie Doland at (979) 209-5073.

Source: Clay Falls with KBTX | Posted: Wed 5:41 PM, Dec 13, 2017 | Updated: Wed 11:20 PM, Dec 13, 2017