Club in Hot Spot Over Fire Escape

There are no lyrics to explain how concerned members of the Dunedin Musicians’ Club are after discovering the 42-year-old institution could be closed for lack of a fire escape.
Club member and fundraising concert organiser Iain Johnstone said the club was recently notified about new fire escape regulations that would severely impact on its operations.

The building has a fire escape but it is no longer compliant with current rules.

Because the club no longer had a second fire exit from its first floor premises down to Manse St, fire authorities had limited the number of patrons in the venue to 50, including band members.

It could hold up to 150 people, Mr Johnstone said.

“Half of our capacity is band members at the moment.
“This puts enormous pressure on our ongoing viability — and ability to survive in the short term — as we plan the way forward,” he said.Most of the club’s income is from bar sales.

“With the limited numbers, we’ve already had to cancel a big concert which normally brings in a lot of revenue.”

Finding another venue would be too expensive, he said.

“If we can’t get the money, it’s a possibility we might have to close the club, which would be a shame after 42 years.”

Mr Johnstone said the non-profit organisation needed about $10,000 to build the new fire escape.

It planned to hold a Mula for Musos concert at the Crown Hotel on September 30, to raise money for the development.

The concert starts at 5.30pm.

Source: Otago Daily Times By John Lewis john.lewis@odt.co.nz

Philadelphia’s L&I Needs Your Help Locating City Fire Escapes

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Philadelphia’s Department of Licenses and Inspections is asking for your help in a public safety campaign. It’s trying to track down every fire escape in the city.

City Council passed a law, last year, requiring building owners to get every fire escape on their property inspected. L&I spokesperson Karen Guss says the department received 400 reports by the July 1st deadline.

But there’s a problem.

“Philadelphia, like almost every city, has no central data base of fire escape locations,” said Guss.

She says the city decided to crowd source the locations.

“We built an app that’s on our website and you can tell us, ‘I saw a fire escape and here’s where it is,’” Guss explained.

Guss says if they find one with no inspection report, the owner will be cited, though the main goal is to get them inspected.

“Folks have a grace period. We very much want them to file those reports now,” Guss said.

The law was inspired by the tragic 2014 death of 22-year-old Albert Suh, killed when the rusty fire escape he was sitting on crashed to the ground near Rittenhouse Square.

Source: CBS Local Philadelphia KYW1060 All News. All the time. @Pat Loeb

Pat Loeb’s radio experience has the makings of a country song: she lived a lot of places, went down a lot of roads, but they all led her home — to Philadelphia and to KYW Newsradio, where she started her career some 30 years ago. Born and rais…
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NFPA 1: Safeguarding Construction, Alteration, and Demo Operations

Chapter 16 of NFPA 1, Fire Code, requires structures undergoing construction, alteration, or demolition operations to comply with NFPA 241, Standard for Safeguarding Construction, Alteration, and Demolition Operations. NFPA 241 provides measures for preventing or minimizing fire damage during construction, alteration, and demolition operations. (The fire department and other fire protection authorities also should be consulted for guidance.)

The requirements of NFPA 241 cover issues such as the location and use of temporary construction for offices, storage, and equipment enclosures; control of processes and hazards such as hot work; temporary heating and fuel storage; and waste disposal. The general requirements also cover temporary wiring and lighting, site security, access for fire fighting, and on-site provision of first aid fire-fighting equipment.

Extensive details from NFPA 241 are included, as extracts, in Chapter 16 of NFPA 1. NFPA 1, 2015 edition, extracts from NFPA 241, 2013 edition.

In addition to compliance with NFPA 241, Chapter 16 contains some additional, NFPA 1 specific, provisions:
A fire protection plan must be establishes where required by the AHJ. (A fire safety program helps control fires and emergencies that may occur during construction or demolition operations by early planning and implementation of safety measures.)
Fire department access roads in accordance with Section 18.2.3 of NFPA 1 must be provided at the start of a project and maintained throughout construction. This ensures adequate access for the fire department should a fire or emergency occur.

Construction and demolition operations can be dangerous, and history has shown us that major fires and property damage can occur, if the proper safety measures are not followed. NFPA 1, through NFPA 241, offer the provisions necessary to ensure safe construction and building demolitions.

For additional information, check out this article from the Jan/Feb 2015 NFPA Journal about the recent uptick in huge fires at residential complexes under construction, and how NFPA 241 can protect these buildings from loss.

Source: Kristin Bigda Fire Protection Engineer with NFPA, Blog Post on Aug 11, 2017

https://community.nfpa.org/community/nfpa-today/blog/2017/08/11/nfpa-1-safeguarding-construction-alteration-and-demo-operations-firecodefridays?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nfpablog+%28NFPA+Today+BLOG%29

Kristin is a Principal Fire Protection Engineer at NFPA. Works with codes and standards related to life safety, building protection, fire doors and passive fire protection strategies.

Howdy Ya’ll! We’ll Be In Texas Next Month To Host a Fire Escape Awareness Seminar, Come Join Us, As We Speak to Local AHJ’s Across Texas About The Dangers of Fire Escapes!

Join us for our monthly meeting & training for June 2017. This month we will be joined by Francisco Meneses with the National Fire Escape Association to discuss fire escapes. We will discuss the basics of code requirements as it relates to the -history of fire escapes -standardizing the process of inspecting fire escape systems -standardizing the process of Repairing, Certifying and/or Load Testing Fire Escape Systems -introduction of Industry Standard Documentation
2012 IFC 1104.16.5.1 Fire escape stairs must be examined every 5 years, by design professional or others acceptable and inspection report must be submitted to the fire code official.

All members in attendance will be issued one CEU for one hour. Please make sure to RSVP and please bring $10 for a buffet lunch.

visit the Fire Prevention Association of North Texas for more details: http://fpant.org/